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S E A S O N ?

When the days begin to lengthen shortly after the winter solstice, we pull our first tulips out of cold storage for forcing in our greenhouse. Thus, spring has begun.  We have tulips in February, followed by greenhouse grown ranunculus, anemones and icelandic poppies. Then, the outdoor spring bulbs begin to wake, and by April the Daffodils, Tulips, Grape Hyacinth, Alliums are hitting their stride. As the days grow longer in May, our biennial and overwintered blooms start - Columbine, Snapdragons, Bells of ireland and Nigella. Meanwhile, the lilies in crates in our greenhouse are coaxed into bloom by the arrival of 'long days' in mid-May.

Spring

February-May

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As the summer solstice approaches, plant growth hastens immensely. In what feels like overnight, plants will double in size -encouraged by the long days and warmer nights. Summer is here. The selection is overwhelming! Peonies, Rudbeckia, Campanula, Feverfew, Strawflower, Phlox, Yarrow, Delphinium are a small taste of the blooms that kick off the season while the weather is still cool. As the heat intensifies, our hot season blooms hit their stride - Sunflower, Zinnia, Dahlia, Celosia, Lisianthus, Cosmos, Marigold.

Summer

June-August

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Autumn

September-November

Until the first frost arrives, many flowers are triggered by the increasingly shorter days to increase their number of blooms substantially. Asters - newcomers to the scene - steal the show in one quick burst. Textural elements like grasses and seed pods, which have spent all summer growing, take the spotlight as new additions to our bouquets - Amaranth, Gomphrena, Millet, Frosted Explosion grass and Sorghum.

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As temperatures drop, and frosts put an end to many of our flowers, we transition to dried flowers. In the height of the season, we harvest blooms that are exceptional for drying. These often papery blooms retain their colour or texture for months or years after they are dried. In our dried bouquets you can find Statice, Strawflowers, Gomphrena, Ammobium, Craspedia, Nigella, Larkspur, Silver Dollar, Lavender.

Winter

December-January

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